You have never talked to a mere mortal…

C.S. Lewis, in his famous lecture/address to Oxford University Church of St. Mary the Virgin, June 8, 1941, entitled, The Weight of Glory, Lewis argued for the significance and purpose of humanity found in the biblical idea of being created by God (with a divine image-bearing capability -imago Dei) and how in Christ we are destined for a renewed glory.  Essentially, it’s a lecture on what it means to be truly human.  Among the many arguments and cases he makes, is the case to love and care for our neighbor – to carry the weight of their glory in how we interact with them and care for them.

“It may be possible for each to think too much of his own potential glory hereafter; it is hardly possible for him to think too often or too deeply about that of his neighbor. The load, or weight, or burden of my neighbor's glory should be laid daily on my back, a load so heavy that only humility can carry it, and the backs of the proud will be broken…

"It is in light of these overwhelming possibilities, it is with the awe and the circumspection proper to them, that we should conduct all our dealings with one another, all friendships, all loves, all play, all politics. There are no ordinary people. You have never talked to a mere mortal. Nations, cultures, arts, civilizations -- these are mortal, and their life is to ours as the life of a gnat. But it is immortals whom we joke with, work with, marry, snub and exploit. ... Next to the Blessed Sacrament itself, your neighbor is the holiest object presented to your senses.”

~ C.S. Lewis, The Weight of Glory